HigherDOSE PEMF GO Mat Review

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Reviewing the HigherDOSE PEMF GO Mat for people who want relaxation, pain relief, and improved sleep. I’m sharing how I use it for all three at the same time! If you’re interested in getting one of your own, check out the link here and use FITNESSISTA15. I’m also a huge fan of the HigherDOSE sauna blanket and the red light face mask. 

Hi friends! How are you? I hope you’re having a wonderful morning! I’m packing up for a little upcoming trip and getting everything ready to go. Ready for some (more) California beach air!

For today’s post, I figured it was time I did a full review for something I use every.single.day: the infrared PEMF Go Mat. I’ve posted about it quite a bit and many friends on IG agreed that it’s worth the hype and one of the best things ever. When I first ordered the mat over a year ago, I knew I wanted something to bring me pockets of relaxation but also energy throughout the day. That’s exactly what it does for me, and today, I’m sharing all the details!

Friendly reminder to check with your doctor before using any new wellness gadgets to make sure it’s a fit for you! This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

PEMF technology promotes rest and digest, which can have a calming effect on the mind.

PEMF technology was originally used by NASA to promote health of the astronauts while in space. PEMF stands for Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy, and is designed to mimic the vibrations found in nature. These vibrations interact with our organs and tissues to help promote healing and relaxation. It’s been scientifically shown to potentially reduce aches, pains, inflammation, improve circulation, and other ailments. It’s been FDA approved for decades and is used in animals as well as humans. You may have seen PEMF used by doctors, surgeons, physical therapists, and chiropractors. Thankfully, they now have lower-cost and portable versions like this, so you can get the benefits at home!

Some studies regarding PEMF technology:

Successful application in post-COVID fatigue regarding mental wellbeing and energy

Effectiveness with neck pain improvement

Improved pain, stif

Peanut Butter Syrup

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Creamy, rich, peanut butter syrup makes a fantastic topping for your favorite stack of homemade pancakes or waffles.

stack of pancakes topped with peanut butter sauce

While you can absolutely make a delicious peanut butter maple syrup with just two ingredients (2 parts maple syrup to 1 part creamy peanut butter) – and I do this quite often, there’s something fun about making it a little more special.

I’ve taken my Grandmother’s waffle sauce and added peanut butter to create a creamy, rich, smooth syrup that’s certain to make every peanut butter lover’s breakfast dreams come true.

While delicious on pancakes, try drizzling some of this syrup over a bowl of diced apples and bananas with chopped peanuts and mini chocolate chips. It is quite the treat at snack time.

Or next time you are enjoying a scoop of ice cream before bedtime, top it with a bit of leftover peanut butter pancake syrup. You won’t regret it.

Peanut Butter Syrup Recipe

You can whip up this syrup recipe in less than 5 minutes. Start by thoroughly whisking the flour and sugar together before adding the milk. If you have the flour and sugar lump free it should keep your syrup lump free as you add the milk.

Heat over low to medium heat until the sauce has thickened and gently bubbled. Avoid a hard rolling boil. Just a low simmer is all that it needed. Keep whisking. Add your peanut butter and keep whisking it on the heat until it is smoothly combined.

After removing from the heat add your vanilla and butter. Stir until combined. Serve warm over a stack of fluffy pancakes. Our favorite though is poured over Chocolate Pancakes.

creamy peanut butter syrup in small white pitcher

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Intergenerational living: what is it and how can it improve our social relationships?

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A closer connection between those across the spectrum of life could hold some magnificent opportunities for all involved. Let’s explore the power of intergenerational living…

Intergenerational living: what is it and how can it improve our social relationships?

How many people do you regularly interact with who are of a different age to you, another generation? Now take away your close friends and family, does that change things?

In reality, apart from maybe someone we work with, or say hello to in the supermarket, many of us only have fleeting moments, rather than deep connections, with people of differing ages and stages of life.

But, why is this so important? Diversity is critical to our wellbeing, offering new perspectives, insight, and even improving our creativity! And intergenerational relationships contribute greatly to this. They go far beyond befriending and volunteering, both of which are still beneficial, but encompass learning, laughing, teaching, supporting, and really experiencing life together.

With so many wide-ranging benefits of intergenerational relationships – socially, mentally, and emotionally – I’d like to celebrate and share some of the ways that they can help you to thrive, and invite you to get involved, too.

A new age

One of the best ways to connect more deeply with other generations is by getting involved in your community – and learning from the range of characters you’ll meet there. Some incredible initiatives have launched over the years, including Food for Life which hosts local events, from cook-a-longs to teaching people how to grow their own food, for people of all ages and backgrounds. Plus, the Eden Project organises a ‘month of community’ in June, inviting people to get together to celebrate friendship, food, and fun with their neighbours.

It doesn’t stop there though. We constantly hear about the care needs of older adults and issues of social isolation. But it’s become apparent, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic, that despite young people having access to large social media channels, they suffer social isolation as much as older adults. Depression and anxiety are not confined to the young either.

The Office of National Statistics estimates that approximately 67 million people live in the UK, and that 18.6% are over the age of 65. By 2041, that figure is set to increase to 26%. At the same time, the increasing cost of living, and various other challenges, means that larger numbers of young people are still living at home. Could there be a way for these parties to support one another, and address the issues of loneliness at the same time?

If we see age merely as a differentiator, we’re pigeon-holing ourselves. It doesn’t fit the 70-year-old motorcyclist or gig-goer, or the teenage baking or cross-stitch enthusiast. It simply gets us trapped in stereotypes, and limits our opportunities to connect – but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Intergenerational living: what is it and how can it improve our social relationships?

Breaking the mould

Drawing together different groups in society has a wealth of benefits, which initiatives like

5 powerful tips for managing conflict in social situations

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Whether it’s a meeting at work or a family dynamic that conjures up concern around the possibility of clashes, here are five effective ways you can proactively manage tough conversations and situations

1. Assume the best

5 powerful tips for managing conflict in social situations

It’s easy to talk ourselves into fearing a situation, and expecting the worst, even when we have no evidence that things will play out as we imagine. However, by catastrophising and anticipating conflict we’re telling ourselves that we’re about to be in danger, and our mind and body will then react as if that is true.

Intercept anticipatory negative thoughts as they enter your mind by asking yourself: ‘Do I know this to be true?’ If the answer is no, ask yourself how you would like the conversation or event to play out instead.

2. Set intentions

You can’t manage how other people will communicate or react, but you can present yourself in a way that you are proud of. By writing down how you will behave and communicate, you’re setting positive intentions that will help you manage your interactions. Read through your intentions again before your meet-up, so they’re fresh in your mind.

3. Put in a pause

If you believe that the situation is going south, you don’t have to passively slide down the slippery route to conflict! Putting a pause in the middle of proceedings can really help.

This is situation dependent, but if things feel like they’re escalating into unproductive territory, simply say: “I really want to continue this conversation. I just need to go to the bathroom/grab some water/blow my nose, and when I get back, let’s talk about this further.”

While you’re away from the discussion, slow your breathing down, making each exhale longer than the inhale, and remember the intentions you’ve set for yourself. When you re-enter the discussion, thank the person for waiting for you – hopefully, tension will have dissipated and tempers will calm.

4. Stay grounded

If verbal conflict should arise, physically ground yourself by placing both feet flat on the floor, and by keeping your breathing steady. Avoid interrupting the other person, and take a breath before you speak, both of which can help to prevent the conversation from escalating into a rally of positional points.

If you believe that the situation cannot be rectified at that moment, say so, and be clear about how you wish to be treated and proceed. This doesn’t have to be combative. You could try: “It seems that we disagree on this. I respect you, and I think it would be great for us both to have some time to think about what we’ve shared. Shall we give each other a bit of time and space to process the discussion, and chat again in a couple of days?”

5. You’re safe and loved

Conflict, or even the anticipation of conflict, can make us feel shaky and off-centre. Take some time to ‘come down’ after your interaction. If you can, take a walk outdoors and use the 5-4-3-2-1 grounding method – focus on five t

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